Saturday, February 9, 2013

Fish and Fun



Fish fry.  Doesn't begin to represent the quantity of wonderful comestibles.
The pictures don't show even half of the tables, or a quarter of the dishes available.



I, for one, am overstuffed.  And I thought I was being so self-disciplined.  Ah, well.  Not something we do every day.

16 comments:

Vee said...

Yum, yum.

Shelly said...

Not every day, but once in a while is great fun and worthwhile!

Jim Grey said...

One of the most joyous phrases in the English language is "fish fry."

vanilla said...

Vee, that sums it up nicely.

Shelly, daily would be a bit fishy.

Jim, fish fry is a joyous occasion.

Lin said...

Looks like a ton of fun! (and food!) There are lots of "recs" down there, eh?

Grace said...

Fish is good but I never got passed the dessert table...

vanilla said...

Lin, yep; lots of old "recs."

Grace, aha! You believe as I do: Eat dessert first; life is uncertain.
passed or past?

Grace said...

"The word past locates something in time, and sometimes in space. It can be
used as an adjective, noun, or adverb."

"“Past” as an adverb: The first meaning the OED cites for past being used as an adverb is “So as to pass or go by; by.” For example: “The ball sped past the goalkeeper.”

"Passed is the past participle of the verb “to pass”. It can be an intransitive verb (one which doesn’t require an object) or a transitive verb (one which requires both a subject and one or more objects).

“To pass” means “To proceed, move forward, depart; to cause to do this.” (OED) This can refer to movement forwards in time, in space, or in life (such as “to pass an examination”)."

And now I'm still confused and unsure...

(And I'm typing this standing up because I don't want to disturb the cat who is sitting on my desk chair...)

vanilla said...

Grace: And thus we have something else in common. I, too, am confused. Maybe. The treatise pretty much characterizes the reason I had such difficulty in grammar class. *grin*

I guess I was thinking "I never got passed the dessert table" might suggest no one passed you the dessert table; or, "I never passed the dessert table" might mean you did not go down that aisle, or it might mean you are still standing at the dessert table.

No, no. You are standing at the keyboard so as not to disturb the cat, and that is quite admirable.

Some of my grammar instructors are doubtless tearing their hair to this day, or they may be spinning in their coffins.

Grace said...

You're right - I think it should be "I never got past the dessert table"

vanilla said...

Grace, in any event we had fun with it, and that is what I like about blogging. Have a great weekend. "See" you Monday.

Joyce Lansky said...

Looks good, but where's your music? The program automatically unlinks posts not related to the topic you linked to. I'm glad I caught your fish before you disappear.

http://joycelansky.blogspot.com

vanilla said...

Joyce, the music goes up 4 o'clock Monday morning. Music Monday? If I am not playing by the rules, oh, well. The music will be there, anyway. Thanks for coming over!

vanilla said...

Joyce, the music goes up 4 o'clock Monday morning. Music Monday? If I am not playing by the rules, oh, well. The music will be there, anyway. Thanks for coming over!

Sharkbytes said...

I am not tempted by either word "fish" or "fried," but I'm glad you liked it.

vanilla said...

Shark, as it is said, to each her or his own!