Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Centaurea cyanus

 As I lay in recuperation this winter I dreamed of the "wild flower" garden I had worked so hard to renew and reseed last fall, so anxious to see the results.

I used a mix of perennials and annuals, so I expect no blossoms from the perennials until next season.  I watched the little plantlets come up this Spring.   I thought that an many of them looked like what I call bachelor's buttons and what most folk call corn flowers.


Sure enough.  They grew quite rapidly and soon we had a wonderful "field" of blooms.  I was a bit concerned, though, for they are quite tall and I was afraid they would shade the tiny other stuff below.  But they seem to be progressing well now, so it is simply wait and see.  There are a few other smaller plants in blossom.





 Daisies back closer to the trees.

A little black bug on the pink flower.  Next to it an oriental lily which is in bud.
Pretty as the other flowers are there is also the ubiquitous dandelion.  It is a wild flower, too, you know.

9 comments:

Secondary Roads said...

I like that kind of "wild" garden.

vanilla said...

Chuck, the wildflower garden was BBBH's idea and we have maintained one for fifteen years. Ditch lilies had taken over so much of the area I had to dig up masses of them last fall so we could start over.

Grace said...

I think that is so pretty - wild and wonderful. Sometimes super well-planned, well-manicured garden seem a bit soul-less. (Will be thinking of you tomorrow - )

vanilla said...

Grace, we enjoy this little garden very much. Thank you for the kind thoughts.

Ilene said...

Beautiful.

Lin said...

The garden is beautiful! I love the colors of the flowers you have.

Thinking of you today...wishing you a successful surgery, a fast recovery and a pain-free future!

vanilla said...

Ilene, glad you like it.

Lin, added bonus: those flowers tend to have a long blooming season!

Vee said...

Beautiful. Wild flowers are very nice, but are overlooked by most gardeners.

vanilla said...

Vee, specialized cultivars are nice, often stunning but there is much to be said for "nature's own."