Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Spammer Outed

I do not appreciate spam comments on this blog.  Yet I cannot help but smile at some of the postings which are ridiculous beyond description.  Here is a sample for your amusement.
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This particular item was posted on a blog entry in which I described, mostly pictorially, our dog-sitting experience.  I do have to give this spammer points, though.  It is true that "folks think about issues that they just do not realize about."  In that statement, he certainly "controlled to hit the nail upon the highest."

I really don't understand why these people engage in this activity.  Unless they simply enjoy being  pimples on the rump of society, I fail to see what they gain.  "Folks could take a signal."  But there are issues that some folks just do not realize about.

11 comments:

Jim said...

They do it because they write software that automatically posts this shinola on blogs everywhere. And then if one person out of 2 million clicks through and buys something, their investment was more than recouped.

Shelly said...

I think the only thing productive thing we can do with the spam comments is to laugh at them. Pimple on the rump of society is a perfect description.

Grace said...

What Jim said - Tho it always amazes me that people would click on such links - and certainly some of those links are really viruses or tracking kinks - click on them at your own peril....

Secondary Roads said...

They are like the climbers who scale mountains "because they are there." Only spammers have set less lofty goals.

vanilla said...

Jim, so, anything for a buck.

Grace, my very thought. Why on Earth would anyone click on one of them?

Chuck, way less lofty.

Lin said...

Oh, they make me crabby. I'm not sure who is worse...spammers or all those automated calls on my phone. arrrrgggghhhh.

Vee said...

The comment is really funny. Apparently we need to send more ESL teachers to China. We are purchasing many things now in an attempt make our lives easier (e.g.. towel racks). Directions for installing these items are obviously written by people whose first language is not English. They sometimes add "ed" to words that should not end in "ed."

I know, I know. I should be holding out for the "Made in America" label, but I'm too tired to do the leg work. Someone would need shop for me in order for that to happen. And besides, our home must have been designed by a Chinese person. Who else would locate an electrical box in the middle of a bedroom and plan for it to be framed? (Frame the box for "displayed," Chinese instructions might read.)

vanilla said...

Lin, and do a very high percentage of those calls come while you are seated for a meal? Aaarrrgggh! indeed.

Vee, my latest experience with this apart from the spam was with a Comcast "representative" who clearly learned English last week. sort of. I am looking forward to seeing the framed electrical box. Oh, will the frame be ornate? Rococo? Or simple, minimalist? Oak? Walnut?

vanilla said...

Shelly, yes. An annoyance, but not likely fatal.

Sharkbytes said...

I think they used translation software. And not even a very good one!

vanilla said...

Shark, I hadn't thought of that, but I suspect that is the case.